How Often Should You Rotate Your Tires?


How often should you rotate your tires?

Taking care of your tires is very essential to promote the lifespan and also longevity of your costly investment. The recommended rate of tire rotation is generally either every 7,500 miles or 6 months; whichever happens to come first. This is roughly about every other oil change. By rotating tires often, it allows the tire tread to wear evenly. For front-wheel-drive vehicles the weight of both engine and transmission is forced upon the two front tires; causing them to wear more quickly than the rears. Leaving the front tires uneven, which may decrease the traction and handling performance.  For the special few who are all-wheel-drive, such as Subaru, Mitsubishi, Audi and BMW your tire rotation is a little more lax.

Many all-wheel-drive vehicles can give you about 8 months before you ...[more]

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The Importance of Rotating Your Tires


Rotating tires is one of the most important (and easiest) things you can do to prolong their service life. But why? Why is it so important?

It’s simple. Front and rear tires wear differently. Parallel parking, cornering, acceleration, three-point turns all put different stresses on the front and rear tires. Not rotating them means that they are going to show different wear patterns, which will affect their tread life and your car’s ride and handling.

Regular rotations mean that your tires will wear more evenly, and will improve your car’s drivability. Chances are you’ll notice a difference in ride and handling with every rotation. So how often should you rotate?

Every other oil change seems like a pretty good rule of thumb (in other words, every 7-10,000 miles). Doing rotations yourself in your ...[more]

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Performance Tire Roundup


Performance cars need performance tires. But what’s the difference between performance tires and ordinary touring tires?

Performance tires are usually made with a softer tread compound for “stickiness” and improved grip, reaction and handling on dry pavement – the compromise is in shorter tread life. Many true performance tires also don’t do well in colder weather, and many drivers switch over to all-season or winter tires in colder months.

Tires with H or V speed ratings are typically considered “performance touring” tires, and many are designed for all-season wear. Tires with the W, Y or Z rating (and an aspect ratio of less than 55) are ultra-high-performance tires, designed for high-speed handling.

We rounded up a few of our best- ...[more]

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How Tires Can Vastly Improve Your Fuel Economy


When you think of enhanced fuel economy, you probably think of the usual things…aerodynamics, engine size, rear end gear ratio, vehicle weight, driving style and speed, and your engine’s state of tune (clean air filter, good spark plugs, etc). Did you know, though, that your tires can have a huge bearing on gas mileage as well? 

  • Tire Size – The bigger, wider and heavier a tire is, the more rolling resistance it presents. Don’t believe me? Go for a ride on a skinny-tire racing bike, then go for a ride on a fat balloon-tire beach cruiser and see the difference. You shouldn’t go for a narrower tire than original equipment, as engineers tune suspensions and steering for a given tire size, but also remember that wider tires can cut into your fuel economy (even if th ...[more]

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How Does Your Driving Style Affect Tires?


Does your driving style affect how your tires wear and hold up? You better believe it does.

If you put a lot of interstate miles on your car, that’s about the easiest thing you can do for the tires and your car’s drivetrain both. Tires and engines both love maintaining steady speeds for hours on end (provided the tires are at the correct inflation).

Here are some things that are likely to compromise your tires’ life, though: 

  • Frequently hauling heavy loads (especially for pickup truck tires)
  • Frequently pulling a trailer
  • Hard cornering
  • Hard acceleration
  • Taking potholes, railroad tracks and bumps at high speeds

It’s not surprising that heavy loads or trailer use would wear out tires prema ...[more]

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OE Tires vs. Replacement Tires


Soooo…it’s time to replace the tires on your late-model car. Maybe you weren’t that crazy about the original equipment (OE) tires, or you just want to try something different. Well, here are some things to consider.

The engineers and design teams that worked on your make and model of car selected a specific brand and model of tire for it. All of their formulations for ride comfort, handling, steering response, traction, noise and vibration isolation, roughness and  overall performance used that specific tire as a benchmark (of course, the bid process for tires entered into it as well). A luxury car might have been designed around a grand touring tire with a quiet ride, an eco-friendly hybrid might use a low-rolling-resistance tire, ...[more]

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Tire Load Rating


You’ve probably heard the phrase “tire load rating” and wondered what exactly it meant. Tire load ratings are a pretty important part of safety and proper tire maintenance, so let’s break it down: 

  • Your tires will have a service description embossed on the sidewall. The service description includes proper inflation levels, tire size, speed rating, and other information. You’ll also find tire load rating on the service description.
  • The higher the load rating number, the more weight your car’s tires are able to handle. However, that doesn’t mean an actual weight limit. Tire load ratings are coded according to federal standards. A rating code of 60 means actual weight rating of 250 kg/550 lb. Rating code of 80: 450 kg/550 lb, rating code of 125 ...[more]

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When Should I Replace My Winter Tires?


If you live in an area that gets cold enough and sees enough winter precipitation to warrant buying winter tires, there’s no substitute for the traction they can provide. Winter tires have come a long way since the heavy-tread, noisy “snow tires” or “mud grips” that were on your dad’s station wagon a generation ago. Modern winter tires offer better ride, road manners and handling than they did in previous years. That doesn’t, however, mean that they are good year-round.

Winter tires are designed with a tread formulation that stays flexible at lower temperatures, which is their chief advantage over all-season tires. All-season tires tend to harden and stiffen at sub-freezing temps, compromising traction and control. The flip side ...[more]

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Simple Tire Roundup: Mud Terrain Tires


Shop for tires by vehicle

First, let’s clear up any potential confusion about all-terrain vs. mud-terrain tire.

All-terrain tires are designed for a whole range of off-road conditions, which could include large rocks and boulders, snow, gravel, loose dirt, sand, mud, you name it. Mud-terrain are specifically designed for mud. While the two designs are similar, mud-terrain tires have a more “open” tread pattern that helps the tires claw through mud, with open segments (or “voids) designed to eject the mud and debris, giving the tire a clean area to grip with as it turns. Mud tires also use a softer rubber formulation for enhanced t ...[more]

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SimpleTire Review: Hankook I*Pike RW11 & i*cept Evo W310


Hankook I*Pike RW11 Review

This affordable winter tire from Hankook is designed using their eco-friendly winter tread formulation, molded into a symmetrical winter tread pattern with a distinct center section and wraparound shoulder blocks. The central grooves on the I*Pike RW11 move water and slush away from the tire’s footprint for excellent traction. The I*Pike RW11 can be used with studs for extreme conditions (where legal), and is designed with a 6-row stud pin arrangement for minimized noise and excellent stud retention. The tread’s block stiffness is optimized and applied through the combination of wave and step kerf, making it an especially good choice for SUVs and light trucks.

The I*Pike RW11 delivers excep ...[more]

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