What’s the Proper Air Pressure For My Car


Experts and analysts seem to be in agreement on this: the days of cheap oil are finished. As countries compete with each other for oil on a global market, the price of refined fuel and gasoline in the United States may fluctuate somewhat, but it’s likely to stay above $3/gallon for the foreseeable future. That means that every driver needs to be aware of what they need to do to optimize their gas mileage…and that includes tires.

Proper Inflation

You probably already know that proper inflation is vital to fuel economy, and that underinflated tires will not only drop your gas mileage, but will negatively affect handling and drivability. Underinflated tires are also unsafe, building heat that can compromise a tire’s service life and possibly cause tire failur ...[more]

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Tire Safety Tips


Tires are something that many drivers take for granted…but they shouldn’t. Tires are as big a part of your car’s overall safety as anything else. These are all things to keep in mind when it comes to tire safety:

  • Proper inflation – Underinflated tires will cost you money in premature tread wear and increased rolling resistance (which means a hit on your gas mileage). Worse than that, though, underinflated tires will compromise your vehicle’s handling and steering, and can dangerously overheat on hot days or long trips. Modern radial tires won’t begin to show signs of deforming until they are at least 30% low on pressure, so just eyeballing a tire won’t tell you if it’s underinflated. Rubber is porous and even brand-new tires lose air, so make a poi ...[more]

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Proper Tire Inflation: Increase Safety and Save Money


Did you know that most tire failure is caused by improper inflation? Irregular wear, tire stress, blowouts, reduced gas mileage, loss of control, and accidents are just a few of the negative effects associated with tires that are not properly inflated.

Many of us simply neglect to check our tire pressure until something goes wrong. In fact, millions of us drive around daily not knowing whether our tires are properly inflated or not.

According to industry recommendations, you should check the pressure in each of your tires and spare once a month or before any long trips. Because recommended inflation pressures are for cold tires, be sure to check them only after they have not been driven for several hours, preferably overnight.

A pressure gauge can easily be used to check tire pressure at home. The recommended pressure for your tires can be found in the vehicle’s manual or on the driver door edge, glove box, or fuel door. Remember that you ca ...[more]

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Tire Pressure Monitoring Systems Help You Keep the Wheels on the Road


These are all important warnings to receive to help prevent damage to your vehicle and to keep you safe- and then there are your tires. It’s not unusual while on the road to see other cars with one or more tires that look low on tire pressure. You may be driving one of those cars. Wouldn’t you want to be warned?

Of course you would, and thanks to your car’s Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS) you can receive immediate feedback on your tire’s inflation level. Since too little tire pressure can lead to tire failure, this is a major safety concern. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) every year in road accidents about 533 fatalities are caused by tire defects. Adding TPMS to every vehicle could avoid 120 of the 533 yearly victims and spare as many as 8,400 injuries every year.

Not only does a TPMS help improve your car’s safety, but it also has a positive impact on your car’s performance ...[more]

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How to Read Your Tires and What They're Trying to Tell You


Improper tire inflation is the single most important factor that causes uneven tire wear. Tire wear will happen naturally thanks to friction that happens during driving, and it's this friction that makes it possible to drive at all. In the absence of friction (e.g., when attempting to drive on an icy surface) your car will not move. Tires are designed to create friction, which produces the force necessary to propel your car, and over time this friction contributes to tire wear.

There are three easy steps to inspecting your tires: Look, Feel, and Test. First, visually inspect all of your tires. Second, feel the tread by hand to detect wear such as cupping, scalloped dips on the edge of the tire, and feathering, treads with a rounded edge on one side and a sharp edge on the other. Finally, test all four tires with a tire pressure gauge for proper inflation. You can purchase a tire pressure gauge for a few bucks at any auto parts store.

So what exactly are ...[more]

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What's the Big Deal about Tires?


What's the Big Deal about Tires?

"Yes, my car has tires. So what? They're black, round, and on the bottom of my car!"

The above about sums up what the majority of consumers understand about automobile tires. Many car owners think of tires only when they create trouble, such as flats, vibrations, and other problems. So, what is the big deal about tires? To put it bluntly, your life is riding on them. Tires are one of the most important components on your car. No matter how much time and money went into engineering the ride, handling, and safety of your automobile, it all means nothing without good tires. A problem with your tires affects all these things. To sum it up, at sixty five miles per hour in heavy traffic, your tires are the last thing between you and the hard surface of the road. Here are a few straightforward, easy to understand, safety tips that every car owner can use to assure your tires are in a safe condition when pull ...[more]

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How to Reduce Tire Wear on Your Vehicle


Anyone that owns a car knows that tires can be expensive. This is especially so for vehicles that require a special kind of tire, or trucks that have larger tires. Having to take your vehicle in to have new tires put on can be a costly endeavor, when you take into consideration the cost of the tires themselves as well as the price you have to pay for the labor of having them put on.


Fortunately, it is possible to reduce the amount of wear that is placed on your tires and extend the driving time you will get from them. Practicing a few simple habits will greatly help to improve the life of your tires and reduce the need for continually having your tires changed.


One of the most important things that you need to do to reduce tire wear on your vehicle is to keep tires properly inflated. All tires come with a recommended tire pressure. If you are unsure of what this pressure is, or whether you need to use a different tire pressure, you can ask ...[more]

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Guide To Inflating Car Tires


Full-service gas stations belonged to the past. One cannot judge if the tires need air just by looking at them or even by kicking them because they are not cycle tires. It is a person’s responsibility to check and add air in tires every month.

Things Needed
-    A garage or gas station that has a facility of Pressurized Air
-    A Tire Pressure gauge

Step 1
First, one has to go to a garage or gas station that has a facility of pressurized air with a gauge.

Step 2
The car should be parked in such a way that one can reach all the four tires with the air hose.

Step 3
The air-pressure specifications of the car's tires have to be found. There is a sticker located on the door jamb of driver's side, trunk or in the glove box.

Step 4
The plastic cap on the air valve would have to be unscrewed. It should be put in the pocket so it does not get ...[more]

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How to Properly Inflate Your Tires


Putting air in your tires sometimes seems like a small, unimportant task. While it is a tiny detail, it is very important. Having the proper amount of air in your tires can, not only prevent you from a dangerous accident, but it can also save on gas mileage which saves money.

In just a few easy steps, you can be on your way to providing a safe ride for yourself and getting some extra cash.

Purchase a digital tire gauge (they usually run around $10) and keep it in your vehicle. You might also want to consider purchasing a small journal to record your tire pressure and your future increased fuel economy.

It is important to know the correct cold tire pressure for your vehicle. Usually, this information is located on a placard inside the driver’s door, the fuel door, the trunk lid, the console door, or in the owner’s manual.

Note that the correct cold pressure may be the same for all four tires or it may vary from front to rear ...[more]

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