Throwback Thursday: 1970 Plymouth Hemi Barracuda

In 1970, the Barracuda had been redesigned from the ground up with a new body style and a shorter, wider version of Chrysler’s B-body, now called the E-body. The radical-looking new ‘Cuda (whose styling is revisited in the modern Dodge Challenger) was available with two versions of the venerable Slant 6 6-cylinder, as well as the 318 V8, 383 two-barrel, 383 four-barrel/dual exhaust, or 440 Super Commando, or the 440 six-barrel Super Commando Six Pak.

The top of the performance heap, however, was the 426 Hemi V8. The 440 Six Pak dialed in at around 390 horsepower, but the dual-four-barrel equipped 426 delivered 425 horsepower, propelling it to 60 mph in 5.8 seconds (in stock form). The Hemi Cuda could make the quarter-mile run in 14 seconds flat, topping 100 mph easily.

As if the outrageous engine ...[more]

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Throwback Thursday: 1969 Boss 429 Mustang

The Boss 429 is sort of a holy-grail of Sixties muscle cars, with only 859 produced in its two-year run. Its origins came from Ford’s efforts to develop a hemi-head engine to go up against Chrysler’s 426 Hemi on NASCAR tracks. NASCAR rules of the day mandated that at least 500 cars with any specific competition engine had to be marketed to the public, and it was decided that the Mustang would be the car for the 429.

Ford hired the Dearborn shop of Kar Kraft to take on the project, modifying 428 Cobra Jet and Mach 1 mustangs to accept the monster engine. Kar Kraft widened the shock towers, modified the front fender wells, altered the front suspension mounts, reposition ed the battery to the trunk, added a manually-opened hood scoop and made other fairly radical changes to the Mustang engine well. The final ...[more]

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Throwback Thursday: 1952 Hudson Hornet

You may not have even heard of the Hudson Hornet – the make hasn’t even been around since the early 50s, and was crowded out of the market by the Big Three from Detroit. The Hornet, however, left a pretty significant mark on automotive design and performance in its day.

Starting with the ’48 models, the Hornet incorporated a “step-down” design, with a dropped floor pan and chassis that lowered the car’s center of gravity and enhanced handling dramatically (it was also the industry’s first true unibody design). The edge in handling  made the Hornet a natural for racing, and by ’51 the Hornet was available with the “7X” engine, a 308-cubic-inch flathead straight-six. The engine featured modifications like twin side-draft one-barrel carburetors, a split exha ...[more]

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Throwback Thursday: 1968 Charger R/T

The Charger is one of the most recognizable silhouettes of all the muscle cars of the 60s (its roles in the movie “Bullitt” and the TV series “The Dukes of Hazzard” didn’t hurt), and it was also one of the biggest –selling muscle cars of the ’68 model year. Of the 100k or so Chargers sold for ’68, well over 17,000 of them were R/T models. So what makes a Charger an R/T? 

  • Front anti-roll bar
  • Heavy-duty front torsion bars
  • Heavy-duty shocks and rear leaf springs

But most importantly…the 440 V8.

The Charger was entirely restyled for ’68, with a slick coke-bottle profile and concealed headlights, and the 375-horsepower 440 Magnum V8 was also pretty f ...[more]

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How Different Tread Works

Surely you’ve noticed the wide range of tread patterns and styles available between different tire brands and models. Here’s a brief technical breakdown of how they all work: 

  • Tread patterns: Tires are commonly designed with symmetrical, asymmetrical and directional tread patterns. Symmetrical treads are the most common, with ribs or tread blocks where the inboard and outboard sections of the tire come together and match. Asymmetrical tread patterns vary the groove pattern of the tire to help deflect water and snow in all-season conditions, making them a good pick for year-round use. The grooves on directional tires form a V shape at the tire’s center, helping to displace water and avoid hydroplaning. The geometry of the tread blocks and tread pattern is designed to fulfill very dedicated, s ...[more]

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Classic Car Communities on FB

One of the great things about Facebook is the way it can bring communities of people together. Regardless of whether you’re interested in heavy metal music, politics, certain movies, certain authors, or if you want to reunite online with people from your hometown, FB has great resources to form these little tribes of people and let them share ideas, opinions and reminisces with each other. For classic car enthusiasts, here are three fantastic little communities: 

  • Classic Cars: Ford, Dodge, Pontiac, Chevrolet, Oldsmobile…regardless of what your preference is, you can find it here. FB’s Classic Cars page doesn’t go into the tech detail that many forums and brand-specific sites do; instead, it’s mo ...[more]

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Throwback Thursday: 3 Best James Bond Cars

Aston Martin Tires

Along with all the womanizing, drinking, fighting and spying that James Bond does, the other thing he’s always been really, really good at is driving. Bond’s been through a lot of cars over the years, including some ones you wouldn’t expect…like a Ford Galaxie and an AMC Hornet…but we picked out three of our favorites: 

  • Sunbeam Tiger – This one dates back to the ’62 film “Dr. No”; in the early 60s, Carroll Shelby took the cute, mild-mannered little Sunbeam Alpine roadster and jammed Ford’s 260 V8 into it. Bond put this little sleeper to good use, of course.
  • Toyota 2000 GT – Featured in ‘67’s “You Only Live Twice,” Toyo ...[more]

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It's Deja Vu: Another Sinkhole Swallows Valuable Property

If you remember the news story from last year where an entire house was swallowed up by a sinkhole in Florida, it may seem like deja vu! Yesterday, Corvette aficionados from around the world gasped a collective sigh as they turned on the news and watched the sad news unfold. An enormous sinkhole, forty feet in diameter, swallowed eight extremely rare Corvettes housed in the National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green, Kentucky. The total value of these classic Corvettes is not yet known but it will be in the millions. The Corvettes ranged in age from 1962 to 2009. Six of them had been donated to the museum while two of them were on loan from General Motors. Two of the Corve ...[more]

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Throwback Thursday: 1921 Mercer Raceabout

Performance cars had to start somewhere, and there were so many obscure, low-production makes before about 1925 or so, it was inevitable that some higher-performance models would come along. The Mercer Raceabout was one of those.

Mercer was founded by two engineers, backed by a significant amount of capital. Their first cars were handcrafted touring sedans, but by about 1910 they had introduced the Type 35R Raceabout. This early race car featured a 293-cubic-inch four-cylinder (pistons the size of gallon jugs!), developing 55 horsepower and capable of propelling the Raceabout to over 90 mph. The Raceabout took five of six races in 1911, losing only at the Indianapolis 500.

In the 1914 Corona Road Race, driver Eddie Pullen set a new speed record of 86.5 mph, breaking the previous speed ecord of 78.72 ...[more]

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3 Tips to Keep Your Paint Shining

We know you’re proud of your ride and want to keep it looking good. Here are some ideas to keep it as shiny and sharp-looking as it did from day one:

  • Be careful about washing:Not all car washes are created equal; the kind with rotating brushes can wear down your car’s finish, especially on an older car. Opt for a no-touch car wash if possible, or just go ahead and wash it yourself. And never, ever wash with laundry detergent or dish soap – the detergent will immediately strip all the wax from your car’s finish. Go with a quality car wash formulation from your local auto parts store. Also, dry your car off afterwards if possible, with a terrycloth towel or chamois; dried water spots not only don’t look good, they can damage your finish.
  • Keep your c ...[more]

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