Caring for New Tires


Tires are something that most people just do not give a lot of thought to until something goes wrong and it’s time to replace them. The good news is, they don’t really need a lot of maintenance (certainly not as much as your car’s mechanical systems do), and it’s pretty easy to take care of them and get a long service life from them. Ther e are a few things, though, that you do need to keep in mind with your new tires.

  • Watch your driving habits. Obviously, if you regularly mash the gas pedal hard enough to break traction and burn rubber, that will take a lot of life off your tires. Besides that, though, be careful about your braking and cornering habits, and go easy over potholes and railroad tracks; they will all take a toll on your tires.
  • Check your ...[more]

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Checking Your Oil and Tires


Whether you own a new car or an automobile that has somehow stood the test of time, regular car maintenance is important to the longevity and usability of your vehicle. Here are a few tips to keeping your car in good condition.

Oil

Checking your engine’s oil should be a regular practice and it’s something everyone can do quite easily. Just remember to check your dipstick regularly and make sure that the oil level is between the low and high marks.

Too little or too much oil can be harmful to your engine and may potentially lead to expensive trips to a mechanic.

Similarly, most engines generally require an oil change every 3000 miles. Old oil can gunk up engines, slowing your entire car down, and causing some extensive damage and problems. Fresh oil will keep your engine running as good as new.

Tires

Tires can endure a lot of punishment day to day. As a material, rubber wears down quite easily, especiall ...[more]

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Proper Tire Inflation: Increase Safety and Save Money


Did you know that most tire failure is caused by improper inflation? Irregular wear, tire stress, blowouts, reduced gas mileage, loss of control, and accidents are just a few of the negative effects associated with tires that are not properly inflated.

Many of us simply neglect to check our tire pressure until something goes wrong. In fact, millions of us drive around daily not knowing whether our tires are properly inflated or not.

According to industry recommendations, you should check the pressure in each of your tires and spare once a month or before any long trips. Because recommended inflation pressures are for cold tires, be sure to check them only after they have not been driven for several hours, preferably overnight.

A pressure gauge can easily be used to check tire pressure at home. The recommended pressure for your tires can be found in the vehicle’s manual or on the driver door edge, glove box, or fuel door. Remember that you ca ...[more]

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Tire Pressure Monitoring Systems Help You Keep the Wheels on the Road


These are all important warnings to receive to help prevent damage to your vehicle and to keep you safe- and then there are your tires. It’s not unusual while on the road to see other cars with one or more tires that look low on tire pressure. You may be driving one of those cars. Wouldn’t you want to be warned?

Of course you would, and thanks to your car’s Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS) you can receive immediate feedback on your tire’s inflation level. Since too little tire pressure can lead to tire failure, this is a major safety concern. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) every year in road accidents about 533 fatalities are caused by tire defects. Adding TPMS to every vehicle could avoid 120 of the 533 yearly victims and spare as many as 8,400 injuries every year.

Not only does a TPMS help improve your car’s safety, but it also has a positive impact on your car’s performance ...[more]

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A Health Check For Your Car


A regular health check is essential to maintain the safety of your car, and spot any problems that may arise from time to time. It is highly advisable that you run a standard test of various vital mechanical elements of your car periodically. Also, it ensures the best chance of your survival in an accident. Regular health checks can spot problems as soon as they become apparent. They also help you save on the mechanic’s bill.


Periodical health checks also ensure that your car is in top roadworthy condition. They minimize the chance of mechanical failure whilst you are driving. The most basic check you should conduct is a break test. Before testing the brakes ensure that you are safely ahead of any cars behind. Then apply relatively firm pressure to the breaks. This would help you get a feel of the responsiveness of the break pads. If you find that breaking is getting slightly sluggish, there can be considerable erosion of the break pads. In this case, it ...[more]

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9 Ways to Winterize Your Car


Check your battery. Cold weather is tough on your car’s battery. The chemical reactions required to generate power in a car battery slow down in extremely cold temperatures. At 5 degrees F, a fully charged lead-acid battery has only half its rated amp-hour capacity. On top of that, during cold weather, your engine requires more current from the battery in order to get the engine started. Combine less power output with more power requirements and you get a car that won’t start on a cold winter morning. So have a mechanic run a battery load test to see if you need to replace the battery. Even if you don’t, he’ll check for and clean up any corrosion he finds on your posts and connections. The mechanic might also fill your battery with distilled water if needed.

Change your wiper blades and refill your wiper fluid. You need to see the road to drive safely, but the build-up of winter precipitation and salt on your windshield can greatly reduce visibi ...[more]

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