How Does Your Driving Style Affect Tires?


Does your driving style affect how your tires wear and hold up? You better believe it does.

If you put a lot of interstate miles on your car, that’s about the easiest thing you can do for the tires and your car’s drivetrain both. Tires and engines both love maintaining steady speeds for hours on end (provided the tires are at the correct inflation).

Here are some things that are likely to compromise your tires’ life, though: 

  • Frequently hauling heavy loads (especially for pickup truck tires)
  • Frequently pulling a trailer
  • Hard cornering
  • Hard acceleration
  • Taking potholes, railroad tracks and bumps at high speeds

It’s not surprising that heavy loads or trailer use would wear out tires prema ...[more]

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The Equus Bass 770


There’s something about those 60s-era muscle cars still resonates with drivers today. It’s the combination of tough, muscular styling with brute-force horsepower and performance that still captures the imagination of drivers 40-plus years later. Unfortunately it’s getting tougher and tougher to find first-generation muscle cars that are still intact and drivable, and the ones that are left are getting pricey. The modern Challenger and Mustang manage to rekindle the same fires, with modern-day emissions compliance, safety and dependability (and performance that matches their long-ago kin). Still, for some that’s just not quite enough. The answer?

The Equus Bass 770.

The Bass 770’s looks evoke the Mustang, Shelby GT500 and Dodge/Plymouth muscle from years ago, with a ...[more]

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Throwback Thursday: 1961 Jaguar E-Type


Few cars are as recognizable as the Jaguar E-Type, with its sleek lines, long hood and elegant profile. It’s a model that’s so renowned that Enzo Ferrari called it “the most beautiful car ever made,” and The Daily Telegraph put it on their list of the 100 most beautiful cars of all time.

The E-Type got its start back in ’57, based around the highly successful dual-overhead-cam XK straight-six engine.  By ’61, the Series 1 XKE was ready to go, with a 3.8 liter three-carburetor version of the XK6 engine putting out 265 horsepower, for a top speed of 150 mph and a 0-60 time of around seven seconds. The XKE was mechanically advanced, with an independent coil spring rear suspension and torsion bar front end; it was also one of the first cars to f ...[more]

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Simple Tire Roundup: Reliable Tractor Tires


There’s a lot to consider when it comes to rear tractor tires – soil compaction, flotation, ride, traction, wear and resistance to damage. We rounded up some of our own favorite tractor tires for you to consider: 

  • Michelin MultiBib – Compared to standard radials, the Michelin MultiBib offers a much larger footprint, with a wider tread and longer sidewall flex zone. The MultiBib’s tread formulation offers up to 35% longer service life than many of its competitors; it also carries a D speed rating, meaning it can carry loads at up to 40 mph.
  • Firestone Performer 70 – All of the Firestone Performer series are an excellent value ...[more]

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Throwback Thursday: 1969 Ferrari Dino 246 GT


Ferrari Dino models may not have the cachet of their exotic models; named after Enzo Ferrari’s son Dino, the name represents Ferrari’s attempt to brand a relatively low-cost sports car. The 246 GT and GTS, produced from ’69 to ’74, was designed with a dual-overhead-cam 2.4 liter V6; in a 2,425 lb car, the 195 horsepower engine meant a 150-mph top speed, with 0-60 in about 6 seconds or so.

Of course, “low-cost” is relative…as is performance! The Dino 246 GT was a solid performer against its contemporaries like the Porsche 911S, Fiat Dino or the Citroen SM, and had a respectable production run of 3,569 cars over its five years. The V6 was a winner, making its way into other Italian performance cars such as the Lancia Stratos. 

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Simple Tire Review: Pirelli Scorpion ATR Review


I put a set of Pirelli Scorpions on an ’08 model Honda CR-V and have since put about 13k miles on them. My experience so far has been pretty good, they’re a pretty comfortable and quiet tire, but they do lack in traction when it comes to wet pavement or snow. I live in Kansas City, and we do see fair amounts of snow here in the winter; the Pirellis get adequate traction in winter conditions, as long as you keep your speed down, but they’re not real inspiring. Of course, that might be a good thing, considering how many people get overconfident and drive too fast in the snow!

The Pirellis are excellent on the highway, with good road manners and a real solid straight-line feel. If you’ve ...[more]

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Throwback Thursday: 1964 Aston Martin DB5


The ’64 Aston Martin DB5 is going to be familiar to any fan of the early James Bond movies – Sean Connery was behind the wheel of a DB5 in “Goldfinger,” a role that made it “the most famous car in the world” at the time. The real-life DB5 was almost as exotic as its Bond-movie counterpart, minus all the weaponry and gadgets; standard equipment on the DB5 included a magnesium-alloy body, a 282 horsepower 4-liter aluminum inline six engine, wool pile carpets, reclining seats, power windows, an oil cooler and even a fire extinguisher. The 2 + 2 coupe was available with a five-speed manual transmission or Borg-Warner automatic, with a 145 mph top speed and 0-60 times of around eight seconds. The DB5 Vantage was a high-performance version of the DB5, with three Weber carburetors and a revised camshaft, producing 315 horsepower. &n ...[more]

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OE Tires vs. Replacement Tires


Soooo…it’s time to replace the tires on your late-model car. Maybe you weren’t that crazy about the original equipment (OE) tires, or you just want to try something different. Well, here are some things to consider.

The engineers and design teams that worked on your make and model of car selected a specific brand and model of tire for it. All of their formulations for ride comfort, handling, steering response, traction, noise and vibration isolation, roughness and  overall performance used that specific tire as a benchmark (of course, the bid process for tires entered into it as well). A luxury car might have been designed around a grand touring tire with a quiet ride, an eco-friendly hybrid might use a low-rolling-resistance tire, ...[more]

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Throwback Thursday: 1957 Mercedes Benz 300SL Gull Wing


The 300SL name has been in the Mercedes stable for a long time, but the 50s-era Gull Wing models may be the best known, and for good reason. Along with the distinctive gull-wing doors, the 300SL had the world’s fastest top speed for its day and was the first car to offer fuel injection for consumer models.

The 300SL was an offshoot of the 1952 W194 race car, with “300” referring to its 3.0-liter engine and SL standing for “Sport Light.” The 300SL featured a tubular steel chassis for balance of strength and light weight. It was this frame that made the gull-wing doors necessary, with part of the chassis passing through the area where the lower half of a standard door would be. Without the gull-wing design, the 300SL would have been awkward to get in and out of; a tilt-away steering column wa ...[more]

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Tire Load Rating


You’ve probably heard the phrase “tire load rating” and wondered what exactly it meant. Tire load ratings are a pretty important part of safety and proper tire maintenance, so let’s break it down: 

  • Your tires will have a service description embossed on the sidewall. The service description includes proper inflation levels, tire size, speed rating, and other information. You’ll also find tire load rating on the service description.
  • The higher the load rating number, the more weight your car’s tires are able to handle. However, that doesn’t mean an actual weight limit. Tire load ratings are coded according to federal standards. A rating code of 60 means actual weight rating of 250 kg/550 lb. Rating code of 80: 450 kg/550 lb, rating code of 125 ...[more]

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