How Does Buying Tires Online Work


The Internet has changed the tire retail business, just like it’s changed how many people purchase their goods. Some might think that it’s time-consuming, expensive or inconvenient to do their tire shopping online, so they still head down to a chain retailer to get their tires and have them installed. Actually, nothing could be farther from the truth.  The reality is that buying tires online is, well... Simple!

Buying tires online eliminates the middleman and the necessary overhead of paying installers and retail help, or maintaining a brick-and-mortar store, passing the savings along to the buyer. It also gives you the option of doing all your homework beforehand, studying up on consumer guides and reviews to make your choices, then taking away the hassle of being high-pressured by a salesma ...[more]

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Throwback Thursday: Dodge Super Bee


Chrysler-Plymouth had a pretty good lineup of full-size muscle cars in the 60s, and today the Super Bee is one of the hardest to come by. The Super Bee was a hot-rodded version of the Coronet two-door, only around for two years; its name came from the Coronet’s B-body designation. While similar to the Plymouth Road Runner, the Super Bee featured a special graphics package and a dashboard/instrument cluster borrowed from the Dodge Charger.

The base engine for the Super Bee was the 335 horsepower 383 V8, with the 425 horsepower 426 Hemi available as an option (only 125 were sold). The Super Bee also featured a beefed-up suspension, high-performance tires and optional Mopar 4-speed transmission. One of the car’s more novel features was the &l ...[more]

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What’s the Proper Air Pressure For My Car


Experts and analysts seem to be in agreement on this: the days of cheap oil are finished. As countries compete with each other for oil on a global market, the price of refined fuel and gasoline in the United States may fluctuate somewhat, but it’s likely to stay above $3/gallon for the foreseeable future. That means that every driver needs to be aware of what they need to do to optimize their gas mileage…and that includes tires.

Proper Inflation

You probably already know that proper inflation is vital to fuel economy, and that underinflated tires will not only drop your gas mileage, but will negatively affect handling and drivability. Underinflated tires are also unsafe, building heat that can compromise a tire’s service life and possibly cause tire failur ...[more]

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The Importance of Rotating Your Tires


Rotating tires is one of the most important (and easiest) things you can do to prolong their service life. But why? Why is it so important?

It’s simple. Front and rear tires wear differently. Parallel parking, cornering, acceleration, three-point turns all put different stresses on the front and rear tires. Not rotating them means that they are going to show different wear patterns, which will affect their tread life and your car’s ride and handling.

Regular rotations mean that your tires will wear more evenly, and will improve your car’s drivability. Chances are you’ll notice a difference in ride and handling with every rotation. So how often should you rotate?

Every other oil change seems like a pretty good rule of thumb (in other words, every 7-10,000 miles). Doing rotations yourself in your ...[more]

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What if I Have Mismatched Tires?


As a general rule, your tires should all have the same tread pattern, construction and size, meaning they should all be the same make, model and age. If they aren’t, you’ll compromise on your car’s control, traction, stability and ride. Mismatched tires could mean tires from different manufacturers, winter tires with all-season tires, run-flat tires with conventional tires or tires with different tread patterns.

Until you can invest in an entire set of tires of the same make and model, and if you’ve only got one mismatched tire in the set, you should put it on the rear. If the tire that had a problem was on the front, take one of your rears and put it on the front to replace it, then put the mismatch tire back on the rear axle. This will probably mean the least impact on handling ...[more]

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Simple Tire Comparison: BFG Mud Terrain vs. Maxxis Bighorn


Thinking about getting a set of mud terrain tires for your full-size truck, 4x4 SUV or Jeep? Let’s compare the BF Goodrich Mud Terrain and Maxxis Bighorn.

Tread Compound

Both tires use a rubber formulation that’s optimized for off-road use, meaning cut and puncture resistance and enough flexibility to conform around off-road obstacles like rocks and stumps when aired-down. The BF Goodrich, however, features the company’s Krawler TEK  construction in the sidewall, an feature that makes them up to 33% stronger than previous generations of the Mud Terrain T/A KM. The Goodrich also features a single strand of bead wire wound over and over for an extra-strong, tight bead seal.

...[more]

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2015 Ford F150 Uses Aluminum Body Panels


In an effort to wring more fuel efficiency out of the F150, the 2015 model from Ford will use aluminum body panels on top of a high-strength (yet lighter) steel frame. The move has shaved 700 lbs from the truck’s curb weight, but it has had its detractors along the way, as people still tend to think of aluminum as beer-can material. Ford did their homework, however.

It turns out that Ford has been testing all-aluminum F-series trucks since 2009, running them in torture tests like the Baja 1,000 and not finding any body cracks or defects at the end. The company has also taken 2014 models, fitted them with aluminum, sent them to fleet buyers and tracked the results; even with extreme usage (like dropping an oilfield drill bit into the bed), the aluminum body panels held up as well as or better than steel.

While aluminum is more e ...[more]

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Aerodynamics and Design


As manufacturers squeeze all the fuel efficiency they can out of their designs, aerodynamics have been a huge concern –as well as looking sleek and advanced, an aerodynamic car cuts wind resistance for enhanced fuel efficiency. Modern designs are a pretty far cry from the boxy sedans of the 70s and 80s, but aerodynamics is hardly a new concern.

All the way back in 1923, Romanian engineer Aurel Persu ruminated on the ideal aerodynamic design; Persu decided that the ideal aerodynamic shape found in nature was a raindrop as it falls to the ground, with a super-low drag coefficient of 0.04. With that as a target, he began to draw up an aerodynamic sedan, with tall wheels mounted flush with the body inside fender wells, a steeply-raked front end, rear wheels spaced much more closely than the front, rounded contours and a rear end that tapered sharply. The Persu ...[more]

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TBT: 1968 Plymouth Road Runner Hemi


Something about the mid-size B-body Dodge/Plymouth cars has always held an appeal; their no-frills appearance called to mind a muscle car version of a highway patrol car. In ’68, Plymouth already had the GTX , based on the Satellite two-door, but they felt the need for a stripped-down counterpart to the more upscale GTX. Their goal: a car that could run a 14-second quarter mile and sell for under $3000.

Chrysler paid $50,000 to Warner Brothers for the name and likeness of Wile E. Coyote’s nemesis the Road Runner (as well as $10,000 to engineer a “beep beep” horn), and the Road Runner was born. The no-frills Road Runner had a plain-jane cloth-and-vinyl bench seat  and rubber floor mats; its base engine was the 335-hp 383 V8. For an extra $714, you could get the Road Runner with the 425-hp ...[more]

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How to Choose the Right Tire


Before we start talking about which tires you need, you should determine whether it’s time to go ahead and get tires…

The minimum depth where tire tread is still effective is 2/32”. Anything lower than that and your tires will no longer resist hydroplaning in wet weather, dry traction is reduced and traction in snow is practically nonexistent. Tires now include “wear bars” at the base of the tread, running at a right angle to the tread; when the wear bars show through, the tires are at the end of their service life. The old-timer’s gauge is the “penny test,” where you put a penny, Lincoln’s head down, into the tread. If the top of the tread no longer touches Lincoln’s head, then it’s time (some now recommend the same test with a nickel or quarter).

Of course, when yo ...[more]

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