5 Ways YouTube Can Save You Money and Time On Car Repairs


A recent conversation between a shop owner and a Master Automobile Technician turned to diagnostic techniques, and where to get repair information. In addition to the usual repair databases such as ALLDATA and Identifix, the Master Tech mentioned he refers to YouTube on a regular basis. Of course, the shop owner (who was double the tech’s age) cringed at the very thought. After all, how could a bunch of hacks with cell phone cameras possibly be more helpful than ALLDATA? It’s true there is a lot of worthless junk on YouTube, such as cat compilations and videos of morons setting themselves on fire, but there’s a lot of valuable information, too. You just have to know what to look for and how to use it. Here are a few tips for using YouTube for your next auto repair project.

Know your stuff- learn the basics

If ...[more]

Read More

7 Baller Super Cars and The Tires They Have


Tires are important; it doesn’t matter how much power you’re making if you can’t get it to the ground. That’s why the most expensive cars in the world use tires that are extremely advanced – and expensive, too.

What kind of tires do the world’s most exclusive cars ride on? To answer this question, we’ve compiled a list of the most lavish cars in the world and their tires. 

Lamborghini Veneno:

Lamborghini Veneno Tires

 

Only two of these $3.9 million dollar cars exist in the United States. Powered by a 6.5 liter V12 engine, the Veneno is capable of over 200 mph. Upfront, it wears Pirelli P-Zero tires in a 255/30 ZR20; outback it’ ...[more]

Read More

12 Of The Best Car Shows On YouTube That You Must Subscribe To


If you're an auto enthusiast, watching videos about cars on YouTube is something you do.  However weeding through the masses of videos can be very daunting.  We've saved you the trouble of trying to find the best channels, as we've put together a list of our favorites.  If you don't see your favorite YouTube channel listed here, comment below and we'll check it out!

Everyday Driver

Todd and Paul from Everyday Driver bridge the gap from hardcore car enthusiasts to the average car guy. They go back and forth with opinions and with insightful details about each car. They may even steer you into your next car purchase!

...[more]

Read More

2015 Ford F150 Uses Aluminum Body Panels


In an effort to wring more fuel efficiency out of the F150, the 2015 model from Ford will use aluminum body panels on top of a high-strength (yet lighter) steel frame. The move has shaved 700 lbs from the truck’s curb weight, but it has had its detractors along the way, as people still tend to think of aluminum as beer-can material. Ford did their homework, however.

It turns out that Ford has been testing all-aluminum F-series trucks since 2009, running them in torture tests like the Baja 1,000 and not finding any body cracks or defects at the end. The company has also taken 2014 models, fitted them with aluminum, sent them to fleet buyers and tracked the results; even with extreme usage (like dropping an oilfield drill bit into the bed), the aluminum body panels held up as well as or better than steel.

While aluminum is more e ...[more]

Read More

Aerodynamics and Design


As manufacturers squeeze all the fuel efficiency they can out of their designs, aerodynamics have been a huge concern –as well as looking sleek and advanced, an aerodynamic car cuts wind resistance for enhanced fuel efficiency. Modern designs are a pretty far cry from the boxy sedans of the 70s and 80s, but aerodynamics is hardly a new concern.

All the way back in 1923, Romanian engineer Aurel Persu ruminated on the ideal aerodynamic design; Persu decided that the ideal aerodynamic shape found in nature was a raindrop as it falls to the ground, with a super-low drag coefficient of 0.04. With that as a target, he began to draw up an aerodynamic sedan, with tall wheels mounted flush with the body inside fender wells, a steeply-raked front end, rear wheels spaced much more closely than the front, rounded contours and a rear end that tapered sharply. The Persu ...[more]

Read More

Today in History: Six Millionth Honda Civic


The word “ubiquitous” might have been coined specifically for the Honda Civic. Civics are so common, such an everyday sight that you don’t even notice them anymore…until you actually pay attention and realize that there are a LOT of Honda Civics on the road.

On July 23, 2007, the six millionth Civic rolled off of Honda’s production lines; the Civic was introduced in 1972 and has been through numerous generations and nine separate design iterations along the way. The tiny two-door first-generation Civic couldn’t have come along at a better time; in ’72, the American auto industry was being shaken up by the first oil crunch as the Middle East turned off the spigot. Big, wasteful cars were suddenly on the outs, American companies were scrambling to introduce (very mediocre) small cars, and in no time the ...[more]

Read More

Today in History: Ford's First Order


Henry Ford wasn’t the first out of the gate with automobiles and the internal-combustion engine – Daimler had a jump on that in the late 19th century – but Ford was definitely the first to see the potential of mass production, mass marketing, and the economy of scale that could make cars affordable for the middle class.

On July 15, 1903, Ford Motor Company took its first order, for an $850 two-cylinder Model A with a “tonneau,” or back seat. Manufactured at Ford’s early Mack Street plant in Detroit, the car was delivered to its new owner, a Chicago dentist, about a week later.

Ford had been working as chief engineer at Detroit’s Edison Illuminating Company plant when he designed and built his first car, the Quadricycle, in 1896. By 1903, he had lined up the investors and financing to fo ...[more]

Read More

Today in History: First 3-Point Seatbelt


If you’ve ever seen pictures of collisions from the 40s or 50s, you might have been surprised at how well the cars would hold up in a fairly serious accident. Even with collisions at 30 or 40 mph, the cars would look only slightly banged-up…the passengers, on the other hand, usually fared much worse. In those days before ‘crumple zone’ designs, the passengers would be the ones absorbing the energy of an impact. In fact, the prevailing wisdom in those days was that a passenger’s chances were much better if he was “thrown clear” of the wreck.

Today, of course, we know better.

By the mid 50s, padded dashboards were starting to appear in some cars, dashboards were being redesigned to get rid of protruding knobs and switches, safety glass was improving and so ...[more]

Read More

Today in History: First 3-Point Seatbelt


If you’ve ever seen pictures of collisions from the 40s or 50s, you might have been surprised at how well the cars would hold up in a fairly serious accident. Even with collisions at 30 or 40 mph, the cars would look only slightly banged-up…the passengers, on the other hand, usually fared much worse. In those days before ‘crumple zone’ designs, the passengers would be the ones absorbing the energy of an impact. In fact, the prevailing wisdom in those days was that a passenger’s chances were much better if he was “thrown clear” of the wreck.

Today, of course, we know better.

By the mid 50s, padded dashboards were starting to appear in some cars, dashboards were being redesigned to get rid of protruding knobs and switches, safety glass was improving and som ...[more]

Read More

TBT: 5 Movie Cars We Want


Let’s get right to it here, shall we? 

  • The DeLorean from “Back to the Future” – The DeLorean was as much a product of the 80s as anything you can think of. With its brushed-stainless skin, angular body lines, gullwing doors and complicated backstory involving the flamboyant John Z. DeLorean himself, the car wasn’t an especially strong performer…but it sure does sum up a point in time nicely.
  • The green Dodge Charger from “Bullitt” – Yes, everyone loves Steve McQueen’s Mustang from the movie…but we kinda prefer the 440-powered Dodge Charger that met a spectacular end. Something about the Charger is more menacing and brutal than the Mustang. May ...[more]

Read More