Throwback Thursday: Dodge Super Bee

Chrysler-Plymouth had a pretty good lineup of full-size muscle cars in the 60s, and today the Super Bee is one of the hardest to come by. The Super Bee was a hot-rodded version of the Coronet two-door, only around for two years; its name came from the Coronet’s B-body designation. While similar to the Plymouth Road Runner, the Super Bee featured a special graphics package and a dashboard/instrument cluster borrowed from the Dodge Charger.

The base engine for the Super Bee was the 335 horsepower 383 V8, with the 425 horsepower 426 Hemi available as an option (only 125 were sold). The Super Bee also featured a beefed-up suspension, high-performance tires and optional Mopar 4-speed transmission. One of the car’s more novel features was the &l ...[more]

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Today in History: Ford's First Order

Henry Ford wasn’t the first out of the gate with automobiles and the internal-combustion engine – Daimler had a jump on that in the late 19th century – but Ford was definitely the first to see the potential of mass production, mass marketing, and the economy of scale that could make cars affordable for the middle class.

On July 15, 1903, Ford Motor Company took its first order, for an $850 two-cylinder Model A with a “tonneau,” or back seat. Manufactured at Ford’s early Mack Street plant in Detroit, the car was delivered to its new owner, a Chicago dentist, about a week later.

Ford had been working as chief engineer at Detroit’s Edison Illuminating Company plant when he designed and built his first car, the Quadricycle, in 1896. By 1903, he had lined up the investors and financing to fo ...[more]

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Throwback Thursday: 1968 Charger R/T

The Charger is one of the most recognizable silhouettes of all the muscle cars of the 60s (its roles in the movie “Bullitt” and the TV series “The Dukes of Hazzard” didn’t hurt), and it was also one of the biggest –selling muscle cars of the ’68 model year. Of the 100k or so Chargers sold for ’68, well over 17,000 of them were R/T models. So what makes a Charger an R/T? 

  • Front anti-roll bar
  • Heavy-duty front torsion bars
  • Heavy-duty shocks and rear leaf springs

But most importantly…the 440 V8.

The Charger was entirely restyled for ’68, with a slick coke-bottle profile and concealed headlights, and the 375-horsepower 440 Magnum V8 was also pretty f ...[more]

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